Trøndelag and a low angle sun
Trøndelag and a low angle sun

As we travelled north from Trondheim we enjoyed the winter sun and the wide open seascapes. The Norwegian coast is protected by hundreds of small islands, some of them large enough to have summer cottages on them. These, we were told are only occupied for a few summer months but the lighting and heating (electric) is often left on through the winter – electricity (due to an abundance of HEP) is relatively inexpensive apparently!

Island panorama - leaving Trondheim
Island panorama – leaving Trondheim

Scenes like the one below are commonplace. Of the 850 or so photographs I took a huge proportion look a lot like this one. I like this one because of the ripples on the sea as well as the story the cottages seem to tell. We were told that traditionally the red ones are for the fishing and are nearer the water, the white one is the house and often a yellow one is a barn. This probably doesn’t apply so much today – but it’s great for a photographer to have these iconic red buildings all over the place!

North of Trondheim
North of Trondheim

To protect the ships there are a huge number of lighthouses along the coast. This one is particularly photogenic – there’s another view of it in an earlier post.

Kjeungskjær Lighthouse, Trøndelag
Kjeungskjær Lighthouse, Trøndelag

Later on – before we had our first encounter with the Northern Lights – we passed through a narrow straits and saw this bridge, one of many along the coast, which all seem to have been built to a similar design and tall enough to let the Hurtigruten ships pass underneath.

Narrow Stokksund sound as the light fades
Narrow Stokksund sound as the light fades

This Post Has 4 Comments

  1. Nice photographs with running commentary of your holiday. The pictures captivate the countryside in all its splendour. It is inspiring and makes one feel this is a place to see and enjoy. Eight hundred and fifty photographs is good going which must have kept you occupied for a considerable period of time. David, your photographs are always a pleasure to look at. You and Jenny keep.safe.

    1. Yes 850 is quite a lot. There were a lot of duplicates as the boat was moving relatively slowly and you tended to take another shot when the landscape changed a little. Hence you just were able to quickly scan the best composition and then work on those. I quickly reduced the number of images to work on to about 100. I competed a photo book the week before last and it arrived yesterday. We were delighted with it!

  2. Really enjoying these, David. That cruise has been on my bucket list for years, but SWMBO prefers warmth! Out of the question for now, anyway. I’m looking forward to the bit where I find out whether photographing the aurora from a ship is feasible… I suspect with very high ISO it probably is, but probably not with a film camera!

    1. Thanks Chris, it was on mine too! The only “cruise” I’d ever thought I’d do. We wereso lucky to get the trip before the clampdown. As for the Northern Lights – I’ll not jump the gun and comment, but a sneeky look on flickr might give you a glimpse of what was possible.

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